Eliminating the Choice Between Taste & Mess – The Coffee Cup Lid Reinvented

| By Amanda Brooks

Sadly, drinking a complex, flavorful and exotic roast of imported coffee from its paper and plastic confinement is a way of life. Taste, aroma and enjoyment of the experience sacrificed for convenience. That was before a small company out of Seattle built a better lid.

It’s one of those, “Why didn’t someone think of this before?” moments. Doug Fleming – coffee devotee, Viora company founder and designer of the Viora Lid decided that drinking a cup of coffee on-the-go didn’t require losing the joy of sipping a fine coffee roast from a mug.

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While protective, that small hole in today’s to-go lid traps aroma and taste inside the cup. (Taste is 75% smell, so along with odor goes the taste of that delicious Kenya AA.) The Viora Lid fixes that.

Fleming’s idea: replace the lid’s small hole with a recessed top that mimics the experience of drinking out of an open-topped cup.

In his design, the drink opening is a slot. It sits in the middle of a recessed drink well. Tip the cup and liquid flows into the well, allowing the beverage to be sipped from the rim – just like drinking from an open cup.

Once the liquid is sipped from the well (or the cup is back to its upright position), any remaining liquid drains back into the cup, and all the liquid left in the cup is protected from spillage.

The Viora Lid’s benefits don’t stop there. Sipping a beverage through a small hole is like drinking it through a straw. It requires guessing at the temperature of the liquid before it reaches the lips. Like the act of drinking from a cup, the Viora Lid’s design gives the drinker an indication of temperature before the liquid burns the tongue.

Thanks to a small company in Seattle and Doug Fleming’s great idea, a 1980s-era design has finally gotten a makeover. A lid that traps hot liquid while releasing aroma and flavor, one that eliminates the guesswork of temperature and still satisfies the need for convenience sounds like one of those inventions plenty of coffee houses and their patrons wish had hit the to-go culture a while ago.